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Wednesday, February 21, 2024

Sydney Knight, Student Work, Relief Sculpture, Response to the book Natural History of The Senses

Details of Skin
Masking Tape, Tracing Paper, Gel Medium,
Yellow Embroidery Floss, Black Foam Board
22" x 14" x 3"












Detail


Detail


Detail




In Process

In-process


In-process


In-process 

 

Remy Sarney, Student Work, Response to the book Natural History of The Senses

 
















Artist Statement:
I read the chapter "Food and Sex" from the book Natural History of the Senses by Diane Ackerman. She describes in this chapter how society aligns body parts with food, extending the concept of sensual pleasure to all the senses. Also included in envy and desire, for both the body and the palette. I visually communicate these concepts with a silhouette of the human body and actual food items. After the presentation of the artwork, I served the food to the audience. 



In Process Photos













Gracie Mitchell, Student Work

Note: This assignment varies. Sometimes students create a base for each sculpture (Figurative Bust Sculpture) and at others they create an additional 10 pieces for one sculpture (Visual Symbols). Both variations can offer students examples. 











 

Ruthie Coffman, Student Work

Note: This assignment varies. Sometimes students create a base for each sculpture (Figurative Bust Sculpture) and at others they create an additional 10 pieces for one sculpture (Visual Symbols). Both variations can offer students examples. 


Business Fish
Air dry clay, Winsor and Newton inks 
5" x 3" x 2"











Center of Attention
Air dry clay and Winsor and Newton inks 
5" x 2" x 3" 






The sculpture entitled Business Fish was inspired by my feelings towards capitalism and hustle culture. My intention in this piece is to visually communicate the dehumanizing nature of the corporate world. The little fish guy represents how individuals are packed into offices like sardines and his little suit communicates the business setting. The skull signifies that this type of lifestyle is poison to us all. It also serves as a reminder that our time is limited- we should strive to truly live our lives instead of acting as machines in a monotonous cycle of work and sleep. While I did try to keep the tone lighter with the actual art style of the fish, I wanted to focus on the poison aspect because I feel strongly that 9-5 jobs are not what humans are meant to do. I want to keep exploring this theme in the future with other mediums. 

The sculpture entitled Center of Attention was inspired by my own struggles with self-consciousness and the fear of others perceiving me. My intent is to visually communicate the anxiety of feeling watched and judged. The eyes surrounding the figure represent the inescapable nature of imagined perception. The figure lies on the ground, folding in on herself with nowhere to go. The most difficult aspect of this piece was the color choice, but I settled on a gradient of shadow overtaking the figure to represent all-consuming insecurity. This piece allowed me to explore my own anxiety more deeply and I intend to continue this theme in my work as well. 













"When eyes turn up in a symbolic role, they are normally linked to themes of perception, vigilance, and, occasionally, psychic powers. On a more ominous level, eyes can be linked to deception, illusion, secret societies holding forbidden eye-opening knowledge, and/or being under constant surveillance."


"Humans typically note the skull and crossbones sign as the almost universal symbol for toxicity."



"In English it’s called as “packed like sardines” (also “packed in like sardines”). This idiom is used to describe an extremely crowded place; to be in a crowded space. It comes from the way that sardines – the small cured fish – are tightly packed and sealed in tin cans. Example: I always use subway to work and it’s packed in like sardines during rush hour."


Eric Gill


Anastassia Zamaraeva 


Melissa MacMichael