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Sunday, March 3, 2013

Slave Mask and Scold's Bridle


"Caption "Esclave Marron a Rio de Janeiro" (Fugitive/Runaway Slave in Rio de Janeiro), based on a drawing by a Mister Bellel. The engraving illustrates a brief article on fugitive slaves in Brazil, and is apparently derived from first-hand information. "Captured fugitives," the article notes, "are forced to do the hardest and roughest work. They are ordinarily placed in chains and are led in groups through the city's neighborhoods where they carry loads or sweep refuse in the streets. This type of slave is so frightful that, while they have lost all hope of fleeing again, they think of nothing but suicide. They poison themselves by drinking at one swallow a large quantity of strong liquor, or choke/suffocate themselves by eating dirt/earth. In order to deprive them of this way of causing their own deaths, they put a tin mask on their faces; the mask has only a very narrow slit in front of the mouth and a few little holes under the nose so they can breathe" (p. 229; our translation)."



"A scold's bridle is a British invention, possibly originating in Scotland, used between the 16th and 19th Century. It was a device used to control, humiliate and punish gossiping, troublesome women by effectively gagging them. Scold comes from the 'common scold': a public nuisance, more often than not women, who habitually gossiped and quarrelled with their neighbours, while the name bridle describes a part that fitted into the mouth. The scold's bridle was also known as the 'gossiping bridle' and the 'Brank(s)', and was commonly used by husbands on their nagging or swearing wives. The device was occasionally used on men; however, it was primarily used on women who agitated the male-dominated society of the era. (image source: Old Electronic Library)"

Images and text found on US Slave Blog.  Link here.

Death Masks





"In Western cultures, a death mask is a wax or plaster cast made of a person’s face following death. Death masks may be mementos of the dead, or be used for creation of portraits. It is sometimes possible to identify portraits that have been painted from death masks, because of the characteristic slight distortions of the features caused by the weight of the plaster during the making of the mold. In other cultures a death mask may be a clay or another artifact placed on the face of the deceased before burial rites. The best known of these are the masks used by ancient Egyptians as part of the mummification process, such as Tutankhamon’s burial mask.
In the seventeenth century in some European countries, it was common for death masks to be used as part of the effigy of the deceased, displayed at state funerals. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries they were also used to permanently record the features of unknown corpses for purposes of identification. This function was later replaced by photography.Wikipedia."  Text and image source from Knowledge Is Power blog.  Link here.


Photos, from upper left:

A patinated bronze death mask of Napoleon Bonaparte is on display during a Los Angeles auction preview November 2, 2001 at Butterfileds in Los Angeles, CA.
The golden death mask of Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen. 1950.
Two men making a death mask, New York, circa 1908.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/adampadam/483133809/in/photostream/
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Saturday, March 2, 2013

Paola Antonelli Treats Design as Art



Since she stepped back from practicing architecture in order to focus on writing about design, teaching and curating gallery exhibitions, Italian native Paola Antonelli has become a force to be reckoned with in the design world. Working at the Museum of Modern Art in New York since 1994, she now heads up the gallery's Architecture and Design department and has worked on shows such as "Humble Masterpieces," which celebrated traditionally unheralded design icons such as the paperclip; "Safe," considering issues of protection, and "Workspheres," a look at contemporary workplace design.


Source is TED Talks

Hector Sos, Artist




Source is Face Culture.  Link here.

Erwin Wurm x Walter van Beirendonck: Performative Sculptures






"These fairy-floss-like human sculptures are the result of a creative collaboration between Austrian performance artist Erwin Wurm and celebrated Belgian fashion designer Walter Van Beirendonck. The series, called Performative Sculptures, essentially involves five people wearing tutu tulle walking around the museum garden at designated times."  Source is Oyster Daly.  Link here.

Adidas Pink


Charlie Le Mindu, Artist


Source is Face Culture.  Link here.

Painted Brides





Koxovar-Bosnian Bride
The tradition, whose origins date from beyond living memory, is virtually viewed by almost all residents with universal pride as it has come to symbolize this place’s special identity. The bride has her face painted to prevent bad luck during the wedding ceremony. Donje Ljubinje is situated in the Shar mountains that form the border between Kosovo and FYROM. The inhabitants call themselves ‘Torbesh.’"  Above images and text from Face Culture.  Link here.



Bulgarian Bride
Source link here

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Madame Peripetie, Artist







"‘Madame Peripetie’ aka Sylwana Zybura is a Polish photographer based in Germany. Sylwana explores the boundaries between fashion, sculpture and the human body, experimenting with various fabrics and patterns; whilst infusing high-fashion elements with abstract and conceptual ideas, creating an eccentric escapade of colour and texture. Her inspirations include surrealism and dadaism as well as the new wave era of the 80s and British post punk scene. Alongside her BA studies in photography at the University of Applied Sciences and Art, Dortmund, Germany, Sylwana also collaborates with up-and-coming fashion designers and is experimenting with short stop-motion films."  Source is Face Culture.  Link here.
Artist website link here.

Soap Doll




"THIS IS AN AMAZING FIND. IT IS A SOLD SOAP DOLL MADE BY THE MONARCH SOAP COMPANY OF LANCASTER PENNSYLVANIA. IT WAS A GIVE AWAY PREMIUM FOR THE MCKINLEY PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN OF 1896. THE DOLL IS APPROXIMATELY 4 1/2" TALL AND COMES NESTLED IN A TERRY CLOTH BUNTING. WONDERFUL CONDITION FOR AN ITEM THAT IS WELL OVER 100 YEARS OLD."

Source is Mid-Century Treasures on Etsy.  Link here.

Gas Masks


Air raid wardens demonstrate a gas mask designed for the elderly 
and those with chest complaints during a mock gas attack 
in which tear gas was released, London, April 5 1941.
Source is Photos of War.  Link here.
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Stacking


I do not have source for this image.  Source info can be e-mailed to me lmongiovi@flagler.edu

3D to 2D, Example



I do not have a source for this image.  
E-mail source info to lmongiovi@flagler.edu

Dinu, Artist


Dinu is based in London, United Kingdom. He studied at London College Of Fashion and graduated in 2011.

Source is Not Just A Lable.  Link here.

Steven Klein, Artist


It's About Time, Student Work

Douglas Stearns. Cross section of soap carving that was painted.




Marlena Lomonaco, Gregor's Room, Student Work


Example of how to solve structural problems with no tape or glue.




Tanis Montgomery, Student Work



These in process pictures show the slow observational process of carving.





Bianca Borghi, Student Work









Mallory Bielecki, Student Work


Excellent example of professional photos and the assignment.







Maggie Lawlor, Student Work

Process pictures of soap carving and a clever solution to adding on the horns.







Victoria Dexter, Student Work


Great examples of photographing three-dimensional work at various angles.